Info

WashingTECH Policy Podcast with Joe Miller

The WashingTECH Policy Podcast is your resource for media and tech law and policy news and interviews. Each week, the WashingTECH Policy Podcast gives you the latest developments in media and tech law & policy, as well as an interview with an influencer in the media and technology sectors, whether they be policymakers, entrepreneurs, politicians or academics. Listen to the WashingTECH Policy podcast to get a quick update in the car, at the gym, between flights, wherever and whenever you need a quick summary of the media and tech policy news and thought leadership driving the week.
RSS Feed
WashingTECH Policy Podcast with Joe Miller
2017
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2015
December
November
October
September


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: April, 2016
Apr 26, 2016

Brian Woolfolk (@brianpwoolfolk) is a seasoned attorney with over 20 years of government relations and congressional investigations experience. He represents a broad array of clients with matters before Congress and federal agencies. Brian also counsels clients involved in high profile Congressional Investigations. In addition, he advises clients on compliance with federal election, lobbying disclosure and gift ban regulations.

Prior to his tenure in private practice, Brian served as a Democratic counsel on the US House Judiciary Committee and advised members and staff on constitutional, environmental, antitrust, criminal justice and investigative issues. Brian also served as legislative counsel to Congressman Robert C. (Bobby) Scott of Virginia, currently the Ranking Member of the Education and Workforce Committee.

In this episode we discussed:

  • How cable networks make money outside of advertising.
  • How the FCC's proposed set-top box rules can help improve content diversity.
  • The "big picture" of policies affecting modern media diversity.

Resources:

Unlock the Box

The Black Count by Tom Reiss

Apr 19, 2016

Patrick Gusman (@Lancieux) is the Chief Operating Officer of Sasha Bruce Youthwork (SBY).

Prior to joining SBY, Patrick was the President and Managing Director of the Equal Footing Foundation, and Managing Director of Social Sector Innovations' Startup Middle School a pilot program that trains and develops a sustainable pipeline of early-stage masters of disruptive technologies from underrepresented backgrounds at the Howard University Middle School of Mathematics and Science (MS)2.

Prior to his work with the Equal Footing Foundation and Social Sector Innovations, he was the Executive Director of the TechNet Foundation, Inc. (ConvergeUS) and Chief innovation Officer at the National Urban League. At ConvergeUS he helped give birth to a series of social innovation including MyMilitaryLife. In his work at the National Urban League, Gusman managed strategic planning and was responsible for introducing a groundbreaking social media effort, www.iamempowered.com.

Gusman received a J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center and a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in Finance and a concentration in French from the University of Notre Dame. He serves on the board of the Kenya Village North Project.

In this episode we discussed:
  • the key misconceptions about youth homlessness.
  • primary reasons for youth homelessness in Washington, D.C.
  • how Sasha Bruce works with homeless youth and their families to help homeless youth get back on their feet.

Resources

Sasha Bruce Youthwork (Twitter|Facebook|Instagram|LinkedIn)

The Chosen by Chaim Potok

Apr 12, 2016
Natalie Cofield (@ncofield) has carved a niche for herself as an entrepreneur, advocate, and speaker on all things business and diversity. Her work has spanned continents, communities and corporations and can currently be found impacting lives and bottom-lines at organizations in cities including Austin, New York, DC, LA, Sao Paulo, Johannesburg, Nairobi and beyond. 
 
A converted management consultant, economic fellow, and economic development director she is the Immediate Past President of the Greater Austin Black Chamber of Commerce, Founding President of the Austin Black Technology Council and Founder of Walker’s Legacy a national women in business collective. 
 
Natalie recently co-founded urban-co lab-- urban innovation focused co-working space and startup incubator designed for community change-makers and innovators looking to create solutions for urban problems throughout the nation.
 
A graduate of Howard and the Baruch School of Public Affairs in New York, her work has been featured in Forbes, BusinessInsider, Black Enterprise, Essence and Ebony among others.
 
In this episode we discussed:
  • How to persevere in your business, job and life even when all you want to do is quit.
  • How Natalie has achieved EPIC success by putting others first.
  • How Natalie maintains balance even while running two profitable companies.
Resources:
Walker's Legacy (Twitter)
Urban Co-Lab
Google for Business
Docusign
On Her Own Ground: The Life and Times of Madam C.J. Walker by A'leia Bundles
The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich by Timothy Ferriss

 

Apr 5, 2016

Beverly Parenti (@thebev) is co-founder and Executive Director of The Last Mile—a nonprofit focused on providing education and training inside prison that can result in gainful employment upon reentry, thereby reducing recidivism and helping redirect spending from prisons to education. 

 
Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan recently visited San Quentin prison to spend time with inmates who are participating in Last Mile’s coding boot camp called Code.7370. On the day of his visit, Zuckerberg wrote on Facebook QUOTE “We can’t jail our way to a just society.” END QUOTE
 
Last Mile’s programming is one of the most requested prison education programs in the U.S. It’s the FIRST program to offer a computer programming curriculum that teaches men and women to become software engineers. The Last Mile will be in six prisons (including 2 women’s facilities by the end of this year, and expand outside of California next year.
 
 
In this episode we discussed:
  • The critical need for programming to not only train inmates on technical skills, but also help them find redemption through their work.
  • How The Last Mile grew from an entrepreneurship training program into a program that includes software engineering as a central component.
  • How policymakers can begin to develop similar programs to help train inmates in their local detention facilities.
  • The Last Mile's revolutionary inmate training method that is spreading nationwide.

Resources:

The Last Mile

The Life We Bury by Allen Eskens

1