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WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller

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Now displaying: September, 2019
Sep 24, 2019

Bio

 

Jeffrey Cole has been at the forefront of media and communication technology issues both in the United States and internationally for the past three decades. An expert in the field of technology and emerging media, Cole serves as an adviser to governments and leading companies around the world as they craft digital strategies.

 

In July 2004 Dr. Cole joined the USC Annenberg School for Communication as Director of the newly formed Center for the Digital Future and as a Research Professor. Prior to joining USC, Dr. Cole was a longtime member of the UCLA faculty and served as Director of the UCLA Center for Communication Policy, based in the Anderson Graduate School of Management. Cole founded and directs the World Internet Project, a long-term longitudinal look at the effects of computer and Internet technology, which is conducted in over 35 countries. At the announcement of the project in June 1999, Vice President Al Gore praised Cole as a “true visionary providing the public with information on how to understand the impact of media.”  Nineteen years into the project, the World Internet Project, through its unique data on Internet users around the world, is the leading, unrivaled international project examining the ways in which technology changes our lives. 

 

Cole regularly presents trends and insights of the project to the White House, FCC, Congress, Department of Defense and heads of governments around the world. He has worked closely with the CEOs of GroupM, Ericsson, Telstra, Wesfarmers and others. On the advisory side, his long-term relationships have included Microsoft, Sony, Time Warner, AT&T, AARP, CBS, NBC, ABC, CPB, PBS, HP, Coca-Cola and many more as they learn to navigate the digital future. He also sits on Unilever’s (the world’s second largest advertiser) Global Digital Strategy Board.

 

In 2016 Cole was one of the founders of the Global Disruption Fund (GDF), a technology investment fund based in Australia (www.globaldisruptionfund.com.au). Cole is one of the members of the Investment Committee identifying innovative companies and those about to be disrupted, making investments based on his work. The Fund is now worth close to $1 billion and growing; it achieved a 40% return in its first year. Since 2017 he has written a popular and widely circulated column on disruption, media, technology and entertainment (www.digitalcenter.org/cole).

 

Under Cole’s leadership, the Center has conducted deep examinations of the entertainment, sports media, transportation and banking industries to identify where the next wave of disruption will occur. More than just identifying trends, the Center works closely with industry to create policies and make the concrete changes that will keep them competitive. That work includes all five (formerly six) motion picture studios, all four networks and now streaming companies, as well as sports networks, leagues, automotive companies and banks.

 

In the 1990s, Cole worked closely with the four broadcast networks (ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox) dealing with television programming issues under an anti-trust waiver that allowed the networks to work together for the very first time. He issued annual reports to the television industry, Congress and the nation. Upon the release of the 1996 report, Cole held a joint press conference with President Bill Clinton, who referred to the Center for Communication Policy as “the premier educational institution setting trends in entertainment.” Nationwide there was unanimous praise for the quality of the reports and their contribution to the television content debate. 

 

Cole has testified before Congress on television issues and has been a keynote speaker at more than 750 conferences on media and technology (many can be seen on YouTube). He has worked with the White House during the Clinton and George W. Bush administrations on media and telecommunications issues. He regularly makes presentations across the U.S., Europe, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East and Africa.

 

Cole was a member of the Executive Committee of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS) from 1997 to 2001 and was the founding governor of the ATAS Interactive Media Peer Group. At UCLA, Cole taught over 35,000 students. In 1987 he received UCLA's Distinguished Teaching Award. 

 

 

 

 

Resources

 

USC Annenberg Center for the Digital Future

 

 

News Roundup

Election security funding bill gets McConnell’s support

 Mitch McConnell, whom Democrats had started to call “Moscow Mitch”, backed a $250 million spending bill last week to help states beef up election security. McConnell had previously blocked two bills that would have boosted security and required paper ballots.

Facebook suspends thousands of apps following audit

Facebook has suspended tens of thousands of apps after an internal audit revealed that they could either have be a threat or didn’t respond to Facebook’s requests for information. Facebook says the move comes after a review of millions of apps following the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The FTC fined Facebook $5 billion over the summer for privacy violations. Meanwhile, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was in town meeting with members of Congress and President Trump at the White House, meetings which sources say were “constructive”. 

Emmy’s awards feature little diversity

Well, there’s not much else we can say about the 71st Emmy Awards other than the fact that this year’s awards offered shockingly little diversity. National Urban League CEO Marc Morial and FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel penned a joint Op-Ed in the Hill released prior to the awards discussing this year’s lack of nominees of color.  For example, not one woman of color was nominated for lead actress in a comedy. This year, just 26 nominees were people of color, compared to 38 last year. Just three people of color ended up winning—RuPaul Charles won for hosting RuPaul’s Drag Race, Jharrel Jerome won for When they See Us, and Bill Porter won for Pose.  When are we gonna stop begging these people to include us, fam? Seriously.

FCC Open Meeting Agenda

The FCC released its open meeting agenda. The meeting will take place at 10:30 at the FCC. A proposal for $950 million in funding for Puerto Rico’s communications infrastructure is first on the agenda.

New York Times ends Spanish language coverage

The New York Times is ending Spanish language coverage. “While the Español site did attract a new audience for our journalism and consistently produced coverage we are very proud of,” the Times said in a statement, “it did not prove financially successful”. New York Times in Español launched in response to President Trump’s hate speech against Mexicans.

NBC/Universal has launched a new streaming service

NBC/Universal has launched a new streaming service dubbed Peacock, which is slated for launch in April. NBC/Universal will join the long list of new Netflix streaming competitors including the likes of Disney, Apple, and HBO Max.

Sep 17, 2019

 

Bio

 

CJ Johnson is an award-winning creative entrepreneur, speaker and internet personality. First known as the go-to “branding guru” supporting hundreds of startups and Fortune 500 companies worldwide with his impactful creative strategies to cultivating hundreds of thousands of social media followers as an influential millennial voice in the fight against social media depression.

Currently based in Los Angeles and New York, CJ is best known for his work in next-generation marketing that includes: creative strategies, the future of work, diversity and inclusion, and influencer marketing.

He was first introduced to the world of business and marketing early in his career but it soared to new heights during the explosion of the startup movement and as the YouTube generation reshaped the industries of the world. Using his professional creative skills, he broke down racial barriers and became a strong voice in the Silicon Beach movement.

After successful ventures overseeing marketing/publicity for several on-demand mobiles apps and startups, he went on to pursue his entrepreneurial passion by creating the digital agency, Januel+Johnson. After a couple of successful years with the agency, CJ and his partner decided to part ways to pursue their own personal passions.

CJ has helped a total of over 128+ Startups, Entrepreneurs, and Fortune 500 companies worldwide find success with effective growth strategies. He now focuses on his primary mission of supporting and inspiring YOU to chase after YOUR dreams.

 

Resources

 

cjjohnsonjr.com

 

News Roundup

 

Twitter takes down violent tweet from Texas state lawmaker

 

Twitter took down the tweet of a Texas state lawmaker for violating Twitter’s policy against promoting violence. The Republican legislator, Briscoe Cain, wrote that his “AR is ready for you” after presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke tweeted “Hell yes, we’re going to take your AR-15s”. O’Rourke called Cain’s tweet a death threat.

 

Intercept: NRA increased Facebook ad spending after El Paso, Dayton shootings

 

The Intercept reported that the National Rifle Association increased its spending on Facebook ads following last month’s shootings in El Paso and Dayton, in which 32 total people were killed. The Intercept reported that the NRA’s Facebook spending reached a high point of $29,000 on August 18th, with $360,000 spent on ads in the month following the attacks. Compared to just $9,400 during the month prior.

 

Hundreds arrested in global wire scam

 

The DOJ announced the arrest of 281 individuals worldwide who were allegedly co-conspirators in a pervasive wire scam targeting banks and their customers. The Hill reports that the scammers target bank employees with access to financial information, whom they then persuade to transfer funds to a fraudulent account. More than half the arrests were made in Nigeria but law enforcement officials also made arrests in the UK, Turkey, Japan and several other countries. The DOJ conducted the operation—dubbed Operation ReWired—along with the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, Departments of Homeland Security, State, and Treasury.

 

Facebook announces efforts to prevent triggering self-harm

 

Facebook announced its efforts to prevent self-harm as part of its participation in World Suicide Prevention Day last Tuesday. The company said it’ll be hiring a health and well-being expert, as well as seek to explore ways to share relevant data with the public that could be used to prevent self harm. Also, Facebook will no longer allow triggering content, such as images of self-harm or cutting.

 

Facebook penalizes Netanyahu’s Facebook page for hate speech

 

Finally, Facebook suspended a chatbot on Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s Facebook page. The chat bot promised site visitors that Netanyahu would pursue a right wing agenda against quote “Arabs who want to destroy us all”. Facebook suspended the bot for 24 hours and promised to take additional action if they detect any further violations.

Sep 10, 2019

 

Bio

 

Malcom Glenn (@malcomglenn) is a writer, speaker, and public policy and communications specialist.

 

Malcom is currently the Head of Global Policy for Accessibility and Underserved Communities at Uber Technologies in Washington, DC, where he leads Uber's worldwide efforts to make the current and future platform more accessible for historically marginalized groups, spearheading the company's work to improve outcomes for people with disabilities, low-income families, communities of color, rural residents, seniors, and returning citizens, among many other groups facing barriers to transportation or work.

 

Malcom is a member of the board of directors for BUILD Metro DC, an organization that helps high school students from low-income backgrounds learn entrepreneurship skills, graduate from high school, and attend college. He's also on the board of directors for the World Institute on Disability, a Berkeley-based nonprofit that works to fully integrate people with disabilities into their communities. Malcom is a former fellow for the Transatlantic Digital Debates program, a joint venture of New America and the Global Public Policy Institute that's focused on building more long-term transatlantic cooperation in the digital age, particularly between Germany and the United States.

 

Malcom is a former executive communications manager at Google in Mountain View, CA, where he developed strategic communications for two of Google’s Chief Financial Officers, the head of the company's Access and Energy practice, as well as their respective leadership teams. 

 

Before joining Google, Malcom was the director of communications at the American Federation for Children, a leading national education advocacy organization focused on expanding educational options for children from low-income communities.

 

Malcom previously worked on issue campaigns at the Democratic polling firm Greenberg Quinlan Rosner, where he helped organizations hone their messages.

 

A native of Denver, CO, Malcom graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor’s degree in history, where he was the president of The Harvard Crimson, the nation's oldest continuously published daily college newspaper.

 

 

Resources

 

Uber - Community

 

Uber - Accessibility

 

Malcom Glenn

 

 

HEADLINES:

Google and Facebook come under intense scrutiny as attorneys general throughout the country and the DOJ open investigations , Paypal suspends an account linked to the KKK and can Uber solve transportation inquality? Malcom Glenn is my guest for this, episode 200

 

News Roundup

 

50 Attorneys General launch Google investigation

 

The Attorneys General from 50 states and territories launched an antitrust investigation into Google Monday. Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia are represented among those that filed lawsuits. California and Alabama abstained.

 

Attorneys General coalition announces Facebook investigation

 

Another coalition of attorneys general from eight (8) states announced an investigation into Facebook on Friday. The coalition, led by New York State AG Letitia James, will investigate Facebook’s dominance in social media. 

 

DOJ requests documents from Google

 

In addition, the Department of Justice made a document request from Google and its parent company Alphabet on Friday. Alphabet says the document request is for documents released during a prior antitrust investigation.

 

PayPal suspends account linked to KKK

 

PayPal suspended the account of the Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan for six days. PayPal had pledged to suspend accounts seeking to raise money for hate groups. And the Loyal White Knights profile linked to a landing page requesting donations. Now the link points to a page that’s no longer accepting donations, the Hill reports.

 

Flagstaff schools close following breach

 

Public schools in Flagstaff, Arizona shut down last week following a ransomware attack. In an effort to find the bug and prevent a re-infection, schools closed Friday as the school district investigated all of the computers issued to teachers and staff. Schools re-opened on Monday morning.

 

14 women sue Lyft alleging that they were attacked by drivers who turned out to be sexual predators

 

Fourteen anonymous women sued Lyft in San Francisco claiming that they were attacked or kidnapped by Lyft drivers. The lawsuit alleges that Lyft mishandled the investigation of the drivers, keeping them on despite the reports. Five of the women, including one woman who is blind, claimed they were raped.

 

8chan founder testifies in House hearing

 

Jim Watkins, the founder of 8chan-the message board on which alleged mass shooters posted manifestos before their rampages, gave a deposition to the House Homeland Security Committee on Thursday. In his prepared testimony, Watkins wrote “"My company has no intention of deleting constitutionally protected hate speech”. The statement came the same day a federal court in the Northern District of California ruled that a man was barred by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act from suing Facebook for treating his alleged hate speech more strictly than similar content posted by white users.

Sep 3, 2019

Examining "Social Media Bias" with Jen Schradie

Jen Schradie joined Joe Miller on the WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast to discuss her work challenging the alleged "social media bias" that has been claimed by conservatives.

Bio

Jen Schradie is an Assistant Professor at the Observatoire sociologique du changement (OSC) at Sciences Po in Paris. Previously, she was a Research Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse, based at the Toulouse School of Economics, as well as at the Maison des Sciences de l’Homme et de la Société, Université de Toulouse. She received her PhD from the Department of Sociology at the University of California-Berkeley with a designated emphasis in New Media from the Berkeley Center for New Media. She also has a master’s degree from the Harvard Kennedy School. Her broad research agenda is to interrogate digital democracy claims with empirical data. Despite recent panic about digital threats to democracy, many theorists have still suggested that the Internet can enable a more participatory, pluralist society, but her research challenges these claims, spanning three areas: the digital divide, digital activism, and digital labor. Schradie has found that inequalities, ideologies, and institutions shape participation in our new information society.

Released in May of 2019 by Harvard University Press, The Revolution That Wasn’t: How Digital Activism Favors Conservatives, traces what she calls the Digital Activism Gap. Rather than early utopian claims of Facebook and Twitter Revolutions or more recent dystopian ones of Russian bots, state-sponsored hacking, or fake news farms, she reveals a more insidious problem. Instead of the internet spawning democracy or then taking it away, it does not have a life of its own. A Digital Activism Gap is driven by social class inequalities, organizational hierarchies, and reformist conservatism. The prototype of the radical left digital protester did not fit the mold of the 34 groups she studied in North Carolina. Digital activists were much more likely to be Tea Party members than student anarchists. These findings challenge the view of the internet as a pluralist space for social movements. This research, funded by the National Science Foundation, has also generated three journal articles in The International Journal of CommunicationSocial Problems and Social Media + Society.

She has published four articles on what she coined as “digital production inequality.” After articles on this topic were published in Poetics and Information, Communication and Society, the publicity she garnered from these publications earned her the 2012 Public Sociology Alumni Prize at UC Berkeley. Currently, she is examining egalitarian claims of tech start-up entrepreneurs in a comparative research project between France and the United States.

Her current projects are on the digital economy – a comparative study between France and the United States and the role of the state in mediating risk with start-ups, with a focus on gender and class inequality. She is also working on a European Commission funded project with partners in the UK and Italy to analyze online hate speech against Muslims.

Before entering academia, Schradie directed six documentary films, including, “The Golf War – a story of land, golf and revolution in the Philippines.” Most of her films, however, focused on social movements confronting corporate power in the American rural South. Schradie’s documentaries have screened at more than 25 film festivals and 100 universities. She is also a beginning banjo player and an occasional yoga teacher.

Resources

The Revolution that Wasn't: How Digital Activism Favors Conservatives by Jen Schradie (Harvard University Press, 2019)

News Roundup

AOC says it’s OK to block Twitter users

New York Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says that public officials should be able to block certain Twitter users for harassment. Ocasio-Cortez tweeted that she blocks only a tiny percentage of users. She also tweeted that users are free to speak their minds, even if others find that speech offensive, but that no one should have to require themselves to be subjected to harassing or abusive speech. Interestingly, a federal appeals court found that the president, because he uses Twitter in his official capacity, can’t constitutionally block users.  

FCC activates disaster reporting for Dorian

The Federal Communications Commission activated disaster reporting for Hurricane Dorian as the hurricane moved up the east coast over the weekend. The FCC wants communications providers in affected areas to provide updates on outages via The Disaster Information Reporting System (DIRS) at https://www.fcc.gov/nors/disaster/.

Tariffs on China begin to take effect

The tariffs that Trump promised to impose on China as part of his trade war against the country went into effect on Sunday. The tariffs will affect some $110 billion worth of Chinese imports across a broad range of goods. Another tranche of tariffs on $160 billion worth of Chinese goods like laptop computers and other consumer devices is set to take effect on December 15th.

Google announces hacking attempt

Google publicly announced a hacking attempt that it found and reported to Apple back in February that targeted iPhones. The company said that going to certain websites using your iPhone gave hackers access to your data by installing malware that would run in the background without your knowledge. Hackers were then able to do things like copy your photos or even access encrypted messages sent via apps like Facebook Messenger or Telegraph. Google representative Ian Beer advised consumers to continue to be wary of the possibility of being hacked, even on devices with robust security features.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey’s account hacked

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey’s Twitter accounted was hacked last week. The hackers commenced to tweet racial slurs and other offensive messages until the posts were deleted within the hour, the Hill reports. Twitter says the hackers gained access to the account due to a security oversight by the wireless carrier that exposed Dorsey’s phone number.

Report: Google to pay up to $200 million to FTC

Politico reported Friday that Google will have to pay up to $200 million to settle allegations that YouTube violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, which prohibits companies from collecting data from children under 13 without parental consent.  Some were disappointed by the news, including Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey, who said the penalty wouldn’t be high enough.

Google contract workers vote to unionize

A group of ninety or so contract workers at Google voted to unionize last week, challenging how the company treats them compared to their full-time employees with whom they, in many cases, work side-by-side. With the help of the United Steelworkers union, about 2/3rds of the data analysts and other white collar professionals voted to unionize. The petition now heads up to the National Labor Relations Board which may formally authorize a union vote.

Fort Collins launches municipal broadband

The city of Fort Collins, Colorado is launching its own municipal broadband network offering up to 1GB of broadband for $60/month. Right now, the service targets 20-30 households but the city’s looking to ramp up. Jon Brodkin at Ars Technica reported that the cable industry vigorously opposed the effort. But voters approved the build out anyway.

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