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WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller

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Now displaying: April, 2018
Apr 24, 2018

techpolicypodcast_washingtech_kadija ferryman

Kadija Ferryman: Achieving Fairness in Precision Medicine (Ep. 135)

Data & Society's Kadija Ferryman joined Joe Miller to discuss data-driven medicine and the policy issues surrounding fairness in precision medicine.

Bio

Dr. Kadija Ferryman (@KadijaFerryman) is a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Data and Society Research Institute in New York. Dr. Ferryman is a cultural anthropologist whose research examines how cultural and moral values are embedded in digital health information, social and biological influences on health, and the ethics of translational and digital health research. She earned a BA in Anthropology from Yale University and a PhD in Anthropology from The New School for Social Research. Before completing her PhD, she was a policy researcher at the Urban Institute where she studied how housing and neighborhoods impact well-being, specifically the effects of public housing redevelopment on children, families, and older adults. She has published research in journals such as Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, European Journal of Human Genetics, and Genetics in Medicine.

Resources

What is Precision Medicine by Kadija Ferryman and Mikaela Pitcan (Data & Society, 2018)

Fairness in Precision Medicine by Kadija Ferryman and Mikaela Pitcan (Data & Society, 2018)

Fact Sheet: Obama Administration Announces Key Actions to Accelerate Precision Medicine Initiative (archived)

Are Workarounds Ethical?: Managing Moral Problems in Health Care Systems by Nancy Berlinger (Oxford University Press, 2016)

 

News Roundup

Facebook still under fire amidst looming GDPR implementation

The EU’s Global Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is set to take effect on May 26th and Facebook is scrambling to manage a ceaseless onslaught of negative press regarding how it handles its users’ data. Ryan Browne at CNBC reports on the dangers of Facebook’s “log in with Facebook” feature, which apparently exposes users’ data to third-party trackers.

Morgan Chalfant at the New York Times reported on a painting app that actually installs malware that harvests users’ payment information, among other things.

Additionally, Ali Breland reports in the Hill that the Department of Housing and Urban Development has reopened an investigation it had closed last year into whether and how Facebook helps facilitate housing discrimination.

Democrats are pushing for tighter data protection rules at the Federal Trade Commission, but that’s unlikely to mean much in the near-term since, with Commissioner Terrell McSweeny’s announcement last week that she’ll be stepping down at the end of this month, the FTC will now be operating with just one of five commissioners—Republican Acting Chair Maureen Ohlhausen. Auditors don’t seem to be offering much in the way of confidence in the manner with which Facebook protects user data. PricewaterhouseCoopers conducted an audit of Facebook and told the FTC, after Facebook knew about Cambridge Analytica, that Facebook was adequately protecting consumer privacy and in compliance with a 2011 consent decree.

Meanwhile, David Ingram reports for Reuters that Facebook has changed its terms of service for 1.5 billion Facebook users in Africa, Asia, Australia and Latin America. Like Europe, their terms of service were governed by Facebook’s headquarters in Ireland. But since Ireland would come under GDPR, Facebook has changed the terms of service in those areas to fall under the more lenient U.S. privacy standards. Facebook says it will apply the same privacy standards around the world.

Clyburn to step down from FCC

Democratic FCC Commissioner Mignon Clyburn has announced that she will be stepping down from the dais at the end of the month. The Obama appointee served at the Commission for eight years and was a rare and passionate advocate for marginalized communities. President Trump will need to nominate a replacement Commissioner who would then need to be confirmed by the Senate. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer is reportedly set to recommend current FCC Assistant Enforcement Bureau Chief Geoffrey Starks, who enjoys broad support from Democrats.

U.S. investigates AT&T/Verizon collusion

Cecilia Kang reports for the New York Times that the DOJ has launched an antitrust investigation into possible coordinated efforts between AT&T and Verizon and the G.S.M.A.— the standards-setting group, to make it more difficult for consumers to switch carriers.  The Justice Department is looking into whether the organizations intentionally attempted to stifle the development of eSIM which allows consumers to switch provides without a new SIM card.

FCC to hold 5G spectrum auctions in November

The Federal Communications Commission voted unanimously last week on a public notice that it will commence spectrum auctions for 5G in the 28- and 24- GHz bands. The auctions will commence on November 14th, beginning with the 28 GHz band.

CNN report: YouTube ran ads for hundreds of brands on extremist YouTube channels

A CNN report found that ads from over 300 companies appeared on YouTube channels promoting extremist groups like Neo-Nazis, conspiracy theorists and other extremist content. Adidas, Cisco, Hershey, Hilton and Under Armour were among the many companies whose ads appeared on these sites. Paul Murphy reports in CNN.

Lyft to invest to offset carbon emissions

Finally, Heather Somerville at Reuters reported that Lyft is launching a program to offset emissions from their 1.4 million drivers. The company will invest in things like renewable energy and reforestation to make up for its emissions, and the amount it invests will grow with the company.

Apr 17, 2018

Carson Martinez: Health Data Privacy 101 (Ep. 134)

Bio

Carson Martinez (@CarsonMart) is the Future of Privacy Forum’s Health Policy Fellow. Carson works on issues surrounding health data, particularly where it is not covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). These non-HIPAA health data issues include consumer-facing genetics companies, wearables, medical “big data”, and medical device surveillance. Carson also assists with the operation of the Genetics Working Group. Carson was previously an Intern at Intel with the Government and Policy Group, working on health, technology, and policy. Before joining Intel, she was an intern for the International Neuroethics Society, and a Research Assistant for both the Data-Pop Alliance and New York University.

Carson graduated from Duke University with a Master’s Degree in Bioethics and Science Policy with a concentration in Technology and Data Policy. She earned her Bachelor’s Degree in Neuroscience with minors in Philosophy and Psychology from New York University. Carson is also a Certified Information Privacy Professional/United States (CIPP/US).

Resources

Future of Privacy Forum

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

 

News Roundup

Trump considers re-joining the Trans-Pacific Partnership

Erica Werner, Damian Paletta and Seung Min Kim reported for the Washington Post that President Trump has ordered officials to look into the possibility of re-joining the Trans-Pacific Partnership –that’s the trade partnership between eleven nations, including Japan, Vietnam and Singapore. The Obama administration had signed the agreement, and Mexico and Canada are participating. But Trump backed out. Now he wants back in, presumably to gain negotiating leverage against China.  

U.S./UK Accuse Russians of hacking home routers

There are fresh allegations today from British and American officials regarding Russia’s spying program. Apparently, Russians may have hacked routers belonging to small businesses and home offices. British intelligence, the National Security Council, DHS and the FBI made the announcement saying they had “high confidence” that Russia led cyberattacks into internet service providers, network routers, government and critical infrastructure. You can find the report in Forbes.

FCC’s Pai won’t investigate Sinclair

Remember the viral video from a few weeks ago in which news anchors on Sinclair TV stations around the country were reading the exact same script? Well, despite the request from 11 Democratic Senators plus Bernie Sanders, who is an Independent, to investigate Sinclair for distorting new coverage, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has declined. He cites the First Amendment. The FCC’s inspector general is currently investigating Pai for improperly paving the way for Sinclair’s acquisition of Tribune Media.  Brett Samuels reports in The Hill.

Apple warns employees about leaking

Mark Gurman reports in Bloomberg on a leaked memo from inside Apple to employees warning them about leaks. The company threatened legal action and criminal charges and indicated that it caught 29 leakers last year, 12 of which were arrested.

New paper finds women find chilly environment in tech companies

A new paper out of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research and Stanford University finds that more women are earning STEM degrees. But they are finding the tech companies in which they find jobs to be stifling environments. Contributing to the chilly environments women technologists often find themselves in are the overt usage of gender stereotypes, an exclusive “geek” culture and other factors that discourage some women from advancing in tech.

 

Apr 10, 2018

Riana Pfefferkorn: The Emerging Trend of 'Side-Channel Cryptanalysis' (Ep. 133)

Bio

Riana Pfefferkorn (@Riana_Crypto) is the Cryptography Fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. Her work, made possible through funding from the Stanford Cyber Initiative, focuses on investigating and analyzing the U.S. government's policy and practices for forcing decryption and/or influencing crypto-related design of online platforms and services, devices, and products, both via technical means and through the courts and legislatures. Riana also researches the benefits and detriments of strong encryption on free expression, political engagement, economic development, and other public interests.

Prior to joining Stanford, Riana was an associate in the Internet Strategy & Litigation group at the law firm of Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, where she worked on litigation and counseling matters involving online privacy, Internet intermediary liability, consumer protection, copyright, trademark, and trade secrets and was actively involved in the firm's pro bono program. Before that, Riana clerked for the Honorable Bruce J. McGiverin of the U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico. She also interned during law school for the Honorable Stephen Reinhardt of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Riana earned her law degree from the University of Washington School of Law and her undergraduate degree from Whitman College.

Resources

The Risks of Responsible Encryption by Riana Pfefferkorn

Riana Pfefferkorn, Everything Radiates: Does the Fourth Amendment Regulate Side-Channel Cryptanalysis? 49 Connecticut Law Review 1393 (2017)

Generation Wealth by Laura Greenfield

News Roundup

Facebook still in hot water

Facebook is still managing the onslaught following revelations that Cambridge Analytica allegedly used Facebook data to sway the 2016 presidential election in favor of Donald Trump. Faceboook upped the number of users whose data Cambridge Analytica acquired by 37 million to 87 million. Originally, Facebook reported that just 50 million users were affected.   In addition, Facebook has had to suspend yet another data analytics firm, CubeYou, for collecting information via quizzes, as Michelle Castillo reports in CNBC. CubeYou misleadingly told users that it was collecting their data for “non-profit academic research”, but it turns out CubeYou was in fact sharing the information with marketers.

Facebook said Friday that it will now require buyers of ads related to controversial political topics like gun control and immigration, to confirm their location and identity. Facebook is due to testify before the Senate Judiciary and Commerce committees on Tuesday, and the House Energry and Commerce Committee on Wednesday, David Shepardson reports in Reuters.

Backpage.com founders indicted

A federal grand jury in Arizona indicted seven Backpage founders on 93 counts of facilitating prostitution and money laundering on Monday.The indictment states that many of the ads on Backpage were of child sex trafficking victims. Federal agents seized Backpage on Friday, and raided the home of Backpage co-founder, Michael Lacey.  Last month, Congress passed changes to Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act to provide that websites may be held liable for knowingly facilitating users’ ability to post illegal content.

Best Buy reports possible data breach

Best Buy reported a possible data breach last week. The company that handles Best Buy’s messaging system, [24]7.ia was hacked late last year, which may have exposed Best Buy customers’ data. Charisse Jones reports in USA Today.

U.S. expanding surveillance of migrants within Mexico

Finally, Nick Miroff and Joshua Partlow report in the Washington Post that the U.S. government is expanding its data-gathering efforts within Mexico. According to the report, the Trump administration is “capturing the biometric data of tens of thousands of Central Americans” who were arrested in Mexico. The U.S. is also operating detention facilities in Mexico. But President Trump had accused Mexico of doing nothing to stop the flow of migrants fleeing Central American countries for the Mexico/U.S. border.

Apr 3, 2018

techpolicypodcast_washingtech_Courtney Cogburn

Courtney Cogburn: Virtual Reality to Improve Race Relations (Ep. 132)

Columbia University School of Social Work Professor Courtney Cogburn joined Joe Miller to discuss her work with virtual reality to improve race relations.

Bio

Courtney Cogburn (@CourtneyCogburn) is an assistant professor at the Columbia School of Social Work and a Faculty Affiliate of the Columbia Population Research Center. Her research integrates principles and methodologies across psychology, stress physiology and social epidemiology to investigate relationships between racism-related stress and racial health disparities across the life course. Her work has been supported by the National Institutes of Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Her current research projects examine:

  1. the effects of cultural racism in the media on physiological, psychological and behavioral stress reactivity and moderating effects of cognitive appraisal processes;
  2. the role of structural racism in producing disease risk; and
  3. chronic psychosocial stress exposure and related implications for understanding Black/White disparities in cardiovascular health and disease between early and late adulthood.

At the end of 2014, Dr. Cogburn received an award from the Provost’s Grants Program for Junior Faculty Who Contribute to the Diversity Goals of the University for a project titled “Black Face to Ferguson: A Mixed Methodological Examination of Media Racism, Media Activism and Health.”

In addition to her academic research, Dr. Cogburn works with the Southern Jamaica Plain Health Center at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston and is a senior advisor at the International Center Advocates Against Discrimination in NYC to educate and build community activism around issues of racism and health.

Before coming to Columbia in July 2014, Dr. Cogburn was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at the Harvard School of Public Health. She received her BA in Psychology from the University of Virginia, MSW from the University of Michigan School of Social Work and PhD in the Combined Program in Education and Psychology from the University of Michigan.

Resources

Columbia School of Social Work

Experiencing Racism in VR by Courtney Cogburn (Ted Talk)

The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo by Tom Reiss

News Roundup

Facebook makes moves to contain Cambridge Analytica fallout

Facebook has made several moves to contain the fallout from the Cambridge Analytica scandal and salvage what remains of its integrity and public image. The company announced that it will now fact-check political photos and videos, allow you to see the personal data they have on you, and limit the sharing of your personal information with data brokers.

Meanwhile, on the legal front, Missouri’s Republican Attorney General has opened an investigation into Facebook’s data collection practices. Attorney General Josh Hawley wants to know about every instance in which Facebook shared user data with political entities, the rates they paid and whether users were notified.  In addition, Facebook will not provide evidence or testify before a U.K. parliamentary committee investigating Facebook’s use of user data. However, he will testify before Congress, and Sunny Bonnell reports in Inc. that it could happen as soon as April 10th.

In addition, housing groups are suing Facebook for allowing real estate advertisers to discriminate against mothers, the disabled and minorities, according to Jordan Pearson in Motherboard. And Ali Breland reported on a memo leaked from 2016 written by Facebook executive Andrew Bosworth suggesting the company’s expansion is justified even if it costs lives from bullying or a terrorist attack.

Sinclair, which is in the process of buying Tribune Media, has anchors read same script

Sinclair Broadcasting, the little-known media company that’s in the process of buying Tribune Media for $3.9 billion, has been accused of being a mouthpiece for conservative viewpoints. Republican FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has been seen by many to have paved the way for Sinclair by relaxing longstanding media ownership rules. Now, Deadspin has put together a video showing dozens of anchors on tv stations owned by Sinclair reciting the exact same script making the same claims about fake news that the Trump administration has been making. Sinclair now reaches 2 out of every 5 American homes, with 193 stations concentrated in midsize markets. The merger with Tribune Media would bring that number up to 236, including stations in New York City and Chicago, if Sinclair doesn’t divest some of the stations.  Emily Stewart reports in Vox. In a Tweet, President Trump defended Sinclair. 

Saks/Lord & Taylor hacked

 Vindu Goel and Rachel Abrams report for the New York Times that a well-known band of cybercriminals hacked the credit and debit card numbers of some 5 million Saks and Lord & Taylor customers. The parent company of the two department stores, Hudson’s Bay Company, said in  a statement that the company has identified the issue, is taking steps to contain it, and will keep the public informed.

Trump attacks Amazon

Trump attacked Amazon on twitter last week, saying the company should be regulated, which led to a dip in the company’s stock prices. But policy experts say that antitrust action against Amazon is a long shot. Laura Stevens reports in the Wall Street Journal.

City of Atlanta hit by cyberattack

Eight thousand employees of the City of Atlanta had to shut down their computers last week. The reason? A ransomware attack. The attackers demanded $51,000 to unscramble government processes usually handled online. While the attack did not affect major systems like wastewater treatment and 911 calls, police officers had to write tickets by hand, none of Atlanta’s 6 million residents could apply for city jobs, and the courts could not validate warrants. Nicole Perlroth and Aland Blinder report in the New York Times.

FCC greenlights SpaceX’s satellite internet service

The FCC has given the green light to SpaceX’s satellite broadband internet service. The company aims to deploy thousands of small satellites to reach underserved areas, such as rural communities, at fiber-like speeds. Samanta Masunaga reports in the LA Times.

 

Tumblr cancels 84 accounts tied to Russia

Morgan Chalfant reports in the Hill that Tumblr took down 84 accounts linked to the Internet Research Agency, the Russian troll farm at the center of a federal investigation into the Russian propaganda campaign that swayed the 2016 presidential election. Last month DOJ Special Counsel Robert Mueller indicted 13 Russians and 3 Russian entities connected to the Internet Research Agency.

Trump administration to look at social media accounts for visas

The Trump administration announced that it is planning to review the social media accounts of people applying for visas to enter the U.S. People entering the U.S. from countries with visa-free status, like the UK, Canada, France, and Germany, won’t be subjected to the additional vetting. But individuals seeking entry visas into the U.S. from countries like India, China and Mexico would need to turn over their social media information. The BBC has the story. But Joe Uchill and Stef W. Kight reported for Axios that ICE already uses Facebook data – not to track immigrants, though, but to track child predators.

D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals to hear challenges to the FCC’s net neutrality order

Finally, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals will now hear the consolidated appeals of the FCC’s December order to repeal the 2015 net neutrality rules. The Ninth Circuit had won the lottery to hear the case, but Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals granted a request to move the cases to the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, which heard the appeals of both the 2011 rules and the 2015 rules, which it had upheld. John Eggerton reports in Broadcasting and Cable.

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